Brig General James Benedict

Born Born 20 sEP 1784 Danbury, Fairfield co., Conn
Married Married May 1812 Deborah Coles at Location
Died Died 23 Jul 1841 Tarrytown, Westchester County, NY

Parents:

Children:

  1. James Milton Benedict; 1814-1867
  2. Ann Augusta Benedict 1819-
  3. Theodore Hudson Benedict; 1821-1885
  4. Mary Matilda Benedict 1824-1849

Deborah Coles and Family

Deborah was b 8Sep1792. She was the youngest dau of James Coles of New York, a dry goods merchant. Mr. Coles was a lineal descendant of one of the original settlers, three brothers Coles, of Long Island.

Military Service

Upon the breaking out of the war of 1812, Mr. Benedict promptly offered his services to the Governor of the state, and was commissioned, June 19, 1812, 1st Lieut., 11th Regt., 1st Brig., Art'y. He served with his regiment during the war, being promoted Captain. He was stationed during the greater part of the war at the forts in New York harbor. After the peace, he continued in the state military service, and rapidly rose to Col., and Brig.-Gen. of Art'y (commission as Brig.-Gen. dated June 27, 1823), until, in March 23, 1826, he was made Maj.-Gen., and placed in command of 2d Div. N. Y. State Art'y. He resigned his commission 4Mar1829.

Political Service

Benedict took a deep interest in politics; being an intimate friend of De Witt Clinton, he was his staunch supporter and an earnest advocate of the Erie Canal. He was sent to the legislature in 1824. It was during this session that a strong opposition to the measures of De Witt Clinton sprang up, culminating in the passage by large majorities in both houses of the resolution, removing him from his office as canal commissioner. Although the legislature was almost unanimous in this matter, Gen. Benedict stood up almost alone and manfully defended him. Upon the final vote, Gen. B. and one other member recorded their votes against Clinton's removal. A revolution in public sentiment made De Witt Clinton Governor of the state, and Gen. B. was the only member of the legislature of 1824 who was returned by his constituents in 1825. Thurlow Weed, in his Reminiscences, published in the New York Times, in winter of 1866, spoke of Gen. B. 'as a worthy and excellent man.' After his second term in the legislature, he retired from public life

Census Records

1850 US Federal Census: Greenburgh, Westchester, New York; Roll: M432_615; Page: 52; Image: 106. 26Aug1850

  • Benedict, Deborah, age 40, b America
  • Benedict, Theodore H, age 28, male, b America
  • Benedict, James, age 8, male, b America
  • Cobb, Edward B, age 35, male
  • Cobb, Ann Augusta age 50, female
  • 4 servants
  • Cobb, Edward B, age 1, male

1860 US Federal Census: Tarrytown, Greenburgh, Westchester, New York; Roll: M653_881; Page: 0; Image: 45. 25Jul1860

  • Cobb, Edward, age 43, male, occ illegible, value of real estate: 15,000, personal: 2000, b CT
  • Cobb, Ann Augusta, age 37, female, value of personal:2000, b NY
  • Cobb, Edward B June, age 11, male, b NY
  • Cobb, Augustus, age 10, male, b NY
  • .....Next Door.....
  • Benedict, Deborah, age 66, female, value of real estate 100,000, personal: 2000, b NY
  • Benedict, Theo, age 35, male, gent, value of real estate: 12,000, personal: 10,000, b NY
  • 4 servants, incl coachman

1870 US Federal Census: Dobbs Ferry, Greenburgh, Westchester, New York; Roll: M593_1114; Page: 372; Image: 741. 6Aug1870

  • Benedict, Theodore, age 49, male, white, farmer, value of real estate: 100,000, b NY
  • Benedict, Debra, age 78, female, white, keeping house, b NY
  • Cobb, Anna, age 50, female, white, b NY
  • Cobb, Edward, age 55, male, white, b NY
  • Cobb, Edward B, age 21, male, white, b NY
  • Cobb, Augustus, age 19, male, white, b NY

This and That

2Jul1885 The will of the Honorable Theodore H Benedict, who died at Tarrytown 14Jun, was offered for probate at the Westchester County, Surrogates Court, at White Plains yesterday. He left an estate of $250,000, and made his sister Mrs Anne Augusta B Cobb, of Tarrytown his sole legatee and executrix. Anne Augusta (Benedict) Cobb is the daughter of James Benedict. James Benedict, a nephew, gave notice of his intention to file objections to the probate of the will on the ground of undue influence, incapacity, and fraud. The case was adjourned until 8Jul. Mr Benedict was a member of the Legistature in 1850 and was the youngest member. The next year he was nominated for Senator, and sat in the Whig Convention which nominated General Scott for the presidency in 1852.

Sources

Benedicts to America, Vol I, Pg 376
16. JONAH5 (Matthew,4 Daniel,3 Daniel,2 Thomas1)
b. 1747; m. Jan. 6, 1781, Elizabeth, dau. Capt. James Inglis of South East, b. 1757, and d. April, 1849, in New York city. "He was a thorough patriot, and took an active part in the Revolutionary war; enlisting, May 11, 1775, with rank of corporal, in his brother Capt. Noble's Co. (Col. Waterbury's Regt.). He was before Ticonderoga, in Aug., 1775, and was commissioned sergeant by Capt. Noble Benedict, Nov. 19, 1775, at Fort Johns. He entered the service again in 1776, as sergeant in Capt. Noble's Co. (Col. Bradley's Regt.), and was taken prisoner, with many others, while on duty at Fort Washington, on the Hudson river, Nov., 1776. He was put on board the prison-ship Grosvenor, lying at the Wallabout, from which he was removed to the old sugar house, and there confined, suffering great hardships from sickness and ill-usage, until permitted to depart, being then, April, 1777, considered at the point of death. He was carried to Danbury, Ct., in a horse litter, about two weeks before Danbury was burnt by the British. He, and his old father Matthew, who was living in Jonah's house, were taken out of their beds before daylight on Sunday morning, April 27, 1777, and tied to trees in his garden, while the British troops set fire to his house (a new one). For damages to his property he was allowed 309 9s. 8d. by state of Connecticut, in May, 1792. He received in the distribution of his father's estate, 158 12s. 4d. (Danbury Prob. Rec., vol. IV, p. 235.) Prior to the Revolution, he carried on a farm, and afterwards was also engaged in manufacturing hats, at South Salem." He d. there, March 28, 1811. Inscription on his tombstone:

"Afflictions sore, long time I bore,
Physicians' art was vain;
Till God did please, to give me ease,
And free me from my pain."

Ch.
1) - MATTHEW, b. April 24, 1782, at South Salem; m. about 1824-25, Miss Hicks of Long Island, whither he removed, and d. in New York, about 1845. Ch.
a) James Lewis, b. 1826; followed the sea, and is now (1870) a captain. Res. Long Island.
i) Daughter, m. Names of other children unknown.
2) - EUNICE, b. March 14, 1783; m. 1808, Benajah Strong, a native of Islip, L. I., residing in New York. He d. Sept., 1860. She res. at New Rochelle.
3) (30.) JAMES, b. Sept. 30, 1784.
4) ABRAHAM, b. Dec. 30, 1787; d. Jan. 1, 1788.

Benedicts to America, Vol I, Pg 386
30. JAMES6 (Jonah,5 Matthew,4 Daniel,3 Daniel,2 Thomas1)
b. Sept. 30, 1784; m. May, 1812, Deborah, youngest dau. James Coles of New York, a dry goods merchant. Mr. Coles was a lineal descendant of one of the original settlers, three brothers Coles, of Long Island. (See Thompson's Hist. L. I., vol. II, Appendix.) She was b. Sept. 8, 1792, and resides at Tarrytown. "James, at an early age, entered his father's hat factory, and later he was, also, apprenticed to his uncle Zadock, and worked in his factory until he became well acquainted with the business. Energetic and ambitious, he thought Danbury, Ct., and South Salem poor fields for enterprise, and, therefore, in 1804, he went to New York and entered the employ of Tweedy & Hoyt, manufacturers and dealers in hats and furs, 37 Maiden Lane. He soon gained the confidence and esteem of his employers, and upon the death of Mr. Hoyt, became a partner. About 1810, they rebuilt their store on the old site, and continued there for many years doing a large and successful business. Mr. Tweedy remained at Danbury, Ct., and superintended the large manufactory they had erected there, while Mr. Benedict managed the store in New York, their southern branches, and the business generally. Upon the breaking out of the war of 1812, Mr. Benedict promptly offered his services to the Governor of the state, and was commissioned, June 19, 1812, 1st Lieut., 11th Regt., 1st Brig., Art'y. He served with his regiment during the war, being promoted Captain. He was stationed during the greater part of the war at the forts in New York harbor. After the peace, he continued in the state military service, and rapidly rose to Col., and Brig.-Gen. of Art'y (commission as Brig.-Gen. dated June 27, 1823), until, in March 23, 1826, he was made Maj.-Gen., and placed in command of 2d Div. N. Y. State Art'y. Gen. Benedict took a deep interest in politics; being an intimate friend of De Witt Clinton, he was his staunch supporter and an earnest advocate of the Erie Canal. He was sent to the legislature in 1824. It was during this session that a strong opposition to the measures of De Witt Clinton sprang up, culminating in the passage by large majorities in both houses of the resolution, removing him from his office as canal commissioner. Although the legislature was almost unanimous in this matter, Gen. Benedict stood up almost alone and manfully defended him. Upon the final vote, Gen. B. and one other member recorded their votes against Clinton's removal. A revolution in public sentiment made De Witt Clinton Governor of the state, and Gen. B. was the only member of the legislature of 1824 who was returned by his constituents in 1825. Thurlow Weed, in his Reminiscences, published in the New York Times, in winter of 1866, spoke of Gen. B. 'as a worthy and excellent man.' After his second term in the legislature, he retired from public life, and, March 4, 1829, resigned his commission as Maj.-Gen. The firm of Tweedy & Benedict was dissolved, 1826-7, Samuel Tweedy retiring.(*) Gen. B. continued business until 1830, under the name of James Benedict & Co., when he removed to an estate he had purchased at Tarrytown, where he resided until his death, July 23, 1841. He was, through his maternal grandmother, a lineal descendant of Hendrik Hudson." Ch.
1) (48.) JAMES MILTON, b. March 5, 1814.
2) - ANN AUGUSTA, b. June 2, 1819; m. April 4, 1848, Capt. Edward Brown Cobb; res. Tarrytown. Their son, Edward Benedict Cobb, is a student at Yale College, class 1872.
3) (49.) THEODORE HUDSON, b. March 13, 1821.
4) - MARY MATILDA, b. June 17, 1824; d. July 7, 1849.

(*) Samuel Tweedy, Esq., died in Danbury, Ct., July 1, 1868, at the age of 92 years. He had been president of the Danbury Bank for nearly forty years.

Footnotes

Tarrytown is a village in the Town of Greenburgh in Westchester County, New York, United States. It is located on the eastern bank of the Hudson River, about 25 miles north of midtown Manhattan in New York City

-- SandeeToo - 15 Feb 2009

Revision: r1.1 - 15 Feb 2009 - 22:22 - Main.guest